Ideas stockholm hack

Published on October 3rd, 2013 | by Caissie St.Onge

34

Ikea Stockholm Chandelier Hack





stockholm hack

Materials: Stockholm chandelier

Description: After pricing vintage Sputnik-type chandeliers, as well as new ones at DWR or Jonathan Adler, we decided we could not tap our retirement funds to splurge on one. We kind of liked the idea of the new Ikea Stockholm chandelier, but our hearts still yearned for that Russian space-satellite vibe. So, we purchased the Stockholm and performed a simple hack on it – we put the acrylic spokes in randomly rather than in the manner prescribed by the directions. Magic. We love it. (Including a pic of the original Stockholm (below), as well as our faux-Sputnikified version.)

stockholm original

Photo: IKEA.com

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The Author

Jules

34 Responses to Ikea Stockholm Chandelier Hack

  1. Andrea says:

    Thanks, good to know you can do it! Maybe I’ll do it in the future

  2. ann says:

    i prefer yours !! LOL ..

  3. mj says:

    simple but really nifty.

  4. FL Mom says:

    Nice work! Compared to yours, the normal lamp is too symmetrical and static. Your personalized version is way more lively.

  5. AG says:

    I prefer yours too! Congratulations on a great hack!

  6. michaela c says:

    wow! I saw this in the catalogue and thought, such a pretty fixture, but what an ugly shape, I didn’t know how it was put together spoke by spoke. this is beautiful!

  7. lisa says:

    Your hack is AMAZING and closely resembles the high end (i.e. out of my price range) models. Question: the website says the chandelier is 28 inches in height; can this length be shortened? I have a hallway this would be perfect for, but at 28 inches, it would hang too low and the website doesn’t specify if the height can be modified. Thanks!

  8. kub says:

    Lisa, on the actual Ikea website, if you go there, the diameter as put together there is 20 inches. It says it has a chain and a hook. So, I imagine you can carefully shorten chain and cord or swag it… gaining maybe 8 inches, but looking at the cup for the ceiling, dont know that it would be that much, maybe a gain of more like 4″. hope that helps

  9. Sam says:

    Didn’t realise the acrylic spoke self-assembly could be modified; I’d assumed the final shape was pre-determined by the design (to prevent error). Definitely gonna try this now!

  10. Olivia says:

    Awesome! Thank you! I’ve been wanting to buy this chandelier but hated the shape.
    I’m so glad it can be customized! Great work! :-)

  11. Nicole says:

    This looks great! Do you have any pictures without an Instagram filter by chance? Just trying to get a better idea what it looks like in person.

  12. Caissie says:

    We were able to shorten the hanging length of the chandelier but cutting the wire cable, but I don’t know the exact dimensions of the “ball.” Our house is fairly small with low ceilings, but while I consider it a statement, I don’t think it’s overpowering. I do have non-filter pics, but not sure how to post one. I will tweet one. My handle is @Caissie.

  13. HSN says:

    Is it possible to change the lightbulb once the chandelier is constructed? A standard light bulb doesn’t quite fit through the bottom ring (and neither does my hand, which is small!)

  14. Mareena says:

    Awesome! I love it, and it looks better than the original.

  15. Carrie says:

    Freaking Awesome!!!! I kept eyeballing this light fixture, but I just wasn’t sold on the shape and size. With your hack idea, it’s a done deal! LOOKS SO MUCH BETTER the way you assembled it!! Fantastic Idea!

  16. Caissie says:

    @HSN, we put an LED bulb in there so we shouldn’t have to change it for 20 years, we hope, BUT, we realized that the best way to change it, if you had to, was to remove one of the C-shaped “slices” of spokes from the upper and lower frames, change the bulb, then replace the slice. That should do the trick!

  17. KT says:

    Looks great! Think it could be sprayed gold or brass? Our room is warmer tones. Thanks!!

  18. Renee Sherman says:

    Love what you did with the chandelier- I can not locate on the ikea website- how many light bulbs does this take, it appears by your photo, it is one but not sure

  19. Suzanne says:

    I did the same kind of thing with my chandelier- it looks better this way, in my opinion.

  20. Mike says:

    I showed this to my wife and we both like your Spuknikified version way better. I think we will do this in our new home. Thanks for inspiring!!

  21. Sharon says:

    This is a fantastic idea! I think I’ll go buy one tomorrow!

  22. renay compere says:

    FREAKING Genius!!!

  23. Sharon says:

    I did this hack yesterday and it turned out great! There are 6 different spokes that come in the package. I put them in in this order: 6,5,4,1, 3,2 trying to space them interestingly and evenly as I went. It wasn’t totally random because I wanted to make sure it didn’t turn out lopsided!

  24. Monika s says:

    Do you have the the steps to how you “hacked” this chandelier? I love what you did. I recently bought this and have it spread out in the spare room and feel overwhelmed in trying to put this together.
    Any help is appreciated.
    Thanks.
    Monika

  25. Ricky says:

    Does anyone think ”bunch of pookie’ s stuck together”?

  26. Jacko says:

    Fab hack. I’d love it, but worried about the dust and how long it will look good. It must be a bugger to clean! Any ideas anyone?

  27. Peilin says:

    my IKEA Stockholm has been sitting in its box for 7 months. you’ve inspired me to break it out. Gosh, you’re genius!

  28. Eric says:

    Please give the instructions of how you did this :)

  29. Caissie St.Onge says:

    @Monica & @Eric, no real instructions, just basically stuck the spokes in one at a time and eyeballed it as we went to make sure we were spreading out the different lengths all over the globe. If you buy the chandelier you will be able to see that there are a certain number of spokes in a few different lengths, so we basically made sure that about 1/4 of each type made it into 1/4 of the globe, if that makes sense. But, we weren’t fussy about making it perfect. @Jacko, we are kind of slobs and rarely clean it even though it is in our kitchen and probably collects the most yuck of anything in our house. After six months, we just ran a Swiffer duster over it and it’s a-ok! @KT, I’m not sure if it would hold spray paint or not, but I will say that the light sort of shines through the acrylic spokes, so if you did try to spray it, it probably wouldn’t be as sparkly because the refraction would be occluded. I think of it as being pretty neutral and complimentary to the other finishes in our house, since it is clear.

  30. Steve says:

    Hi, my wife and I just bought the chandelier and think your style is great! One question: how would you shorten the length of the cord? Our ceiling is low, so we need to make it as short as possible and cannot figure out how to do this and preserve the extra cord (trying to get it into the dome) in the event we want to move it to another location. Thanks for the advice/help!

  31. Jann says:

    Just used your fabulous hack! Actually, at the Ikea in Orlando they had one set up Sputnik style & I fell in love with it. Many of you are concerned about the size of this chandelier, so I will share my finished measurements from the ceiling. My electrician shortened the cord and wire to the maximum physically possible and my hung fixture is 36″ to longest bottom spoke. I can not figure out any way to make it less unless you come up with a way to replace the half sphere that mounts to the ceiling bracket with something flatter. An assembly tip: I inserted all the longest spokes into the fixture first to insure they are evenly spaced throughout the fixture, and the I inserted to next longest spokes, again spacing evenly throughout. From there you can more or less randomly fill in with the shorter spokes, still trying not to put any two identical spokes next to each other. It took be about 1 1/2 hours to fully assemble all spokes and I did not find any need to switch spokes around, using my method.

    Hope this info is helpful.

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