furniture rope+table-796501

Published on October 10th, 2011 | by Jules IKEAHacker

4

Rope Ain’t just for Jumpin’: Nautical Rope Table





Materials: NORESUND Table black-brown, rope, drill, tacky glue and hot glue

Description: Take the rickety design and turn it into a gorgeous new table.

Who could resist?

Here is how to make your own rope table:

What you will need:

table
drill
rope
tacky glue
glue gun
scissors
gloves as some rope will give you splinters (I chose sisal rope and it was great to work with)

First thing I did was drill a hole in the top of the table just large enough to get some rope through.

Tie a knot on the bottom of the table top to have a tight starting place for the rope. I glued my knot in place so it would remain taut during the process.

Start winding the rope slowly. You will need to use the hot glue on the first loop, after that use the tacky glue for majority of the project. The hot glue dries to fast, and you will need to work the rope with your hands to get it nice and tightly looped.

Keep winding. Use glue on every turn and make sure ropes are placed against each other tightly. I used a weight to hold the rope down so it laid flat during the process.

Wrap the rope to the edge of the table and one additional loop before you start the coil on the side of the table. This way, the table coils will flow smoothly.

I turned the table upside down to make sure the top would be flat while wrapping the last coil that overhangs the top. After that, get it good and dry before you start working on the sides, it just makes it easier. Start coiling up the sides. I used a clip to hold the rope while I was pulling along the sides. Wrap until you have exceeded the side of the table top.

When you have wrapped the whole side of the table you want to cut the rope and tuck it under. Preferably in the same spot that the coil started to overlap the table top.

Once tucked, use the hot glue to hold the rope end in place. I chose to add a bit of duct tape to make sure that it doesn’t get loose. At this point, with the hot glue I looked over the table top edges and made sure that they were all tightly fitting. Adding a little hot glue to those places that looked a little loose.

Now, for the base, start with drilling the hole in the center of the small disc, tie a knot and start wrapping, continue the top of the disc and stop when you reach the top sides. No overhang on this part.

I had to up the hot glue usage at this point. I still used the tacky, but because of the wrap around the post, the glue needed to be dry fast. So, pulling hard, wrap once around the posts/legs and glue them. This first leg coil should be done the same height as the disc top. From there keep coiling tight and using hot glue on the leg areas. You should still be using the tacky glue on all the coils too.

At the end, and where the coil started wrapping downward, tuck the rope behind the coils and tuck into a space between the disc and the coils. Hot glue in place. Now use the hot glue to touch up any saggy or lose parts on this lower rope parts.

For more info on the hack, please follow the link to my blog.

~ shelby leni, San Diego, Ca

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The Author

Jules IKEAHacker

"I am Jules, the engine behind IKEAHackers and the one who keeps this site up and running. My mission is to capture all the wonderful, inspiring, clever hacks and ideas for our much loved IKEA items".

4 Responses to Rope Ain’t just for Jumpin’: Nautical Rope Table

  1. MyFuZZyButtZ says:

    It’s nice looking, I like it! As long as there are no cats in your house, who would want to use the rope as a scratch pad, then you’re good to go with something that looks pretty classy. Good Job!

  2. Anonymous says:

    I really like this. The original table was fairly average. This is just so pretty.

  3. Nick Austin says:

    Looks great. Perfect for a nautical themed room

  4. jennifer says:

    These tables were really disappointing when we bought them. Rickety is a good way to describe them. We started out with three. When we were down to one, I realized that it might be a good idea to try an epoxy in every place where the table screws together. Suddenly, I had a sturdy little table and the regret that I had not thought of and tried the epoxy sooner.

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